Realityofdating com

He showed me new music, food, and gave me a new perspective to consider.

His family welcomed me with open arms and I am a better person because of it.

I grew up in one of the seventeen cities in the United States named Rochester (Wikipedia, 2015).

” didn’t become frequently asked questions until I began attending school at Towson University (TU) as a freshman.

To them, Black men were filthy and diseased, which could only mean one thing: I was too.

As my luck with white men plummeted, I was inevitably pushed further towards black guys.

How many times had I said “Mom, I met this guy, he’s white”?

“They’re riddled with sexually transmitted diseases” one ignorant guy messaged me on Tinder after seeing a single picture of me with black guys on my profile.Flo Rida’s “Can’t Believe It” flowed through party speakers with its lyrics “Damn that white girl got some a** I don’t believe it” and “black girl got some a** it ain’t no secret”, taking me back to feelings of insecurity I started having as a little kid.The first time I had ever questioned my physical appearance was before I even began first grade.” I became known as that girl who was only interested in dark men and suddenly, the body that took me years to become comfortable with became one I was questioning again.“You have no a**, Erica” one guy commented at one of these parties as LL Cool J’s “Big Ole Butt” blasted through speakers, while another told me he was willing to deal with my lack of a chest because I had “an a** like a dancer.” Many of the songs on the radio by black artists seemed to put emphasis on parts of the body that I was lacking.This was the place I was born and raised; where nobody had to whisper the “n word” or hesitate to stick some feathers in their hair and paint their skin red as a sign of school spirit.

You must have an account to comment. Please register or login here!