Nigeria on line dating scam

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No stranger has a right to access your bank account number, credit or debit card number, debit card PIN, or Social Security number.If their photo appears under several different names or as a stock image on a website, they're probably a poser. Do whatever it takes to kick them out of your life.Then, once you hand over your banking info and pay a "small fee" to cover the expenses related to the transfer, the so-called "prince" sucks your savings dry. If an unsolicited email reads like a drunk text, it's probably a hoax. That's a clear sign that Sandra doesn't know what the hell she's talking about. Spare yourself the trauma of a drawn-out, potentially inconclusive criminal investigation.The Nigerian scam is also called the "419" scam because 419 is the article of the Nigerian penal code that prosecutes fraud. Your best defense against a Nigerian scam is not to fall for it in the first place.They might also use your money to buy prepaid credit cards, set up new accounts, or buy expensive goods to ship abroad.Don't give them a dime of your hard-earned savings.DISCLAIMER: It is PROHIBITED by law to use our service or the information it provides to make decisions about consumer credit, employment, insurance, tenant screening, or for any other purpose subject to the Fair Credit Reporting Act, et seq.

Can they use your bank account to hold their money? They just need access to your bank account to set up the transfer. "Be delieve trough (US MAIL)" — That's not an autocorrect fail. And even if law enforcement pinpointed the exact identity of the scammer, the perp would have to be extradited to the U. Because they have so many people on their payroll — about 30 percent of scammers' earnings go to paying bribes — it's difficult for Nigerian and international policing agencies to track down specific individuals.Nigerian scammers take billions of dollars every year from unsuspecting victims.To keep up their insane cash flow, they have to stay ahead of the con game.Some victims of advance-fee scams have been beaten, threatened, even murdered. Send the messages you receive to your local FBI office, or register a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission.Don't, under any circumstances, agree to meet face-to-face. The scammer might be part of a larger criminal ring that's already under investigation by federal law enforcement. You're probably devastated and embarrassed by what they did.If you've given your money or banking information to a possible con artist, report the scam immediately. No need to throw out your computer and swear off love and happiness forever.

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